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Can Social Causes Motivate us to Recycle More?

Spyro Kalos
Manager Recycling - MobileMuster, AMTA

What we know today is every person in Australia generates 23 kilograms of e-waste per year, along with this there are over 25 million old mobiles stored in our homes and in the workplace. That sure does sound like a lot of e-waste cluttering up our homes. You would think that recycling would be a priority for most of us. Not only does recycling help recover much needed precious resources that can be reused, but it also helps us declutter – that in itself will make us feel good.

So then why aren’t more Australians recycling, why are we holding onto old, broken and unwanted gadgets? In fact regardless of the type of electronics you have stored in your home, over 95% of the material can be recovered through recycling. Many of us know recycling is a good thing, good for our mental health along with great for the environment, research conducted by MobileMuster shows that 80% or more of Australians know that they can recycle their mobiles. 

Can partnering with social causes and charities help to incentivise people and give them another reason why they should declutter and recycle? I can tell you that recycling is a good thing, but maybe I am preaching to the converted. To grow our recycling effort MobileMuster has to find ways to encourage recyclers and non-recyclers. MobileMuster has been using charity partnerships for almost 10 years. The role the partnerships play is twofold, they help drive awareness of mobile phone recycling and MobileMuster, along with the charity, but they also help increase the recycling of mobile phones and accessories.

The full article complete with insights and references to other partnerships eg. Landcare, Oxfam, Salvation Army and Able Australia, can be found on the MobileMuster website.

This is an extract of an article written by Spyro Kalos, Manager Recycling at MobileMuster and originally published in Inside Waste on 1 March 2017. It is republished here with permission by Mayfam Media

14 March 2014

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How will 5G improve network performance

While the technical standards for 5G are still being developed, experts agree that 5G will offer: Latency of less than 1ms; Ability to deliver speeds of up to 10 Gbps and beyond; Energy efficiency in running 1000s of devices; and Improved network capacity by enabling millions of low bandwidth devices to connect simultaneously. Where 4G focussed on providing improved speed and capacity for individual mobile phone users, 5G will enable more industrial applications, and could be a major technological driver in industrial digitalisation. For more information about 5G read our latest report from Deloitte Access Economics. Download the complete report.

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ARPANSA's latest literature review reports on new Australian study which finds no increase in brain cancer with mobile phone use

In The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA's) regular EMR literature survey for May 2016, ARPANSA report on the recent Australian study by Professor Simon Chapman which asks the question "Has the incidence of brain cancer risen in Australia since the introduction of mobile phones 29 years ago?".  The paper pubslished in cancer epidermology compared mobile phone ownership with the incidence of brain cancer in Australia.  In the study, brain cancer incidence rates from 1982 to 2012 are compared with the number of mobile phone accounts in the Australian population from 1987 to 2012. The study found that although mobile phone use increased from 0% to 94% during the 30 year period brain cancer incidence rates were stable.  This finding is consitent with previous studies in the US, UK. New Zealand and Nordic countries. See ARPANSA's commentary here: Full paper may be found here: