mobilemuster-ozharvest-3.jpeg

Can Social Causes Motivate us to Recycle More?

Spyro Kalos
Manager Recycling - MobileMuster, AMTA

What we know today is every person in Australia generates 23 kilograms of e-waste per year, along with this there are over 25 million old mobiles stored in our homes and in the workplace. That sure does sound like a lot of e-waste cluttering up our homes. You would think that recycling would be a priority for most of us. Not only does recycling help recover much needed precious resources that can be reused, but it also helps us declutter – that in itself will make us feel good.

So then why aren’t more Australians recycling, why are we holding onto old, broken and unwanted gadgets? In fact regardless of the type of electronics you have stored in your home, over 95% of the material can be recovered through recycling. Many of us know recycling is a good thing, good for our mental health along with great for the environment, research conducted by MobileMuster shows that 80% or more of Australians know that they can recycle their mobiles. 

Can partnering with social causes and charities help to incentivise people and give them another reason why they should declutter and recycle? I can tell you that recycling is a good thing, but maybe I am preaching to the converted. To grow our recycling effort MobileMuster has to find ways to encourage recyclers and non-recyclers. MobileMuster has been using charity partnerships for almost 10 years. The role the partnerships play is twofold, they help drive awareness of mobile phone recycling and MobileMuster, along with the charity, but they also help increase the recycling of mobile phones and accessories.

The full article complete with insights and references to other partnerships eg. Landcare, Oxfam, Salvation Army and Able Australia, can be found on the MobileMuster website.

This is an extract of an article written by Spyro Kalos, Manager Recycling at MobileMuster and originally published in Inside Waste on 1 March 2017. It is republished here with permission by Mayfam Media

14 March 2014

Rat

Final NTP results cannot confirm mobile phone cause cancer in humans

The long awaited final results of the decade-spanning US National Toxicology Program on radiofrequency energy exposure has found no consistent effects in male and female mice and rats exposed to mobile phone signals for their whole life (2 years). However, in a sub-section of the study, researchers found that at the highest doses for the longest periods of time, cellphone radiation might cause a rare cancer in male rats. “High exposure to radiofrequency radiation (RFR) in rodents resulted in tumours in tissues surrounding nerves in the hearts of male rats, but not female rats or any mice, according to draft studies from the National Toxicology Program (NTP),” said a press release from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences where the program is headquartered.

Annual Report 2.jpg

AMTA Annual Report 2017

In 2017, the strong demand for mobile services continues to have an impact on our economy and society as the industry shifts its focus in preparation for 5G, the next generation of mobile technology. AMTA’s latest Annual Report includes the following highlights: As industry prepares for 5G the need for regulatory reform in spectrum management and network infrastructure deployment is increasingly urgent. 5G Mobile – Enabling Businesses and Economic Growth Report by Deloitte Access Economics found that 5G is expected to further drive Australia’s digital economy. It will add to the already significant (and growing) $34 billion in long-term productivity benefits from mobile; and annual network spend from mobile providers is expected to reach $5.7 billion in FY2017-18. The MCF has focused on an agenda of legislative reform to support the efficient and flexible deployment of network infrastructure.

Quote5.jpg

How will 5G improve network performance

While the technical standards for 5G are still being developed, experts agree that 5G will offer: Latency of less than 1ms; Ability to deliver speeds of up to 10 Gbps and beyond; Energy efficiency in running 1000s of devices; and Improved network capacity by enabling millions of low bandwidth devices to connect simultaneously. Where 4G focussed on providing improved speed and capacity for individual mobile phone users, 5G will enable more industrial applications, and could be a major technological driver in industrial digitalisation. For more information about 5G read our latest report from Deloitte Access Economics. Download the complete report.