Stuart+Henrietta-final.jpg

Recycling Old Phones Creates 60,000 Meals

How Aussies’ old, broken phones dialled up 60,000 meals for those in need

Australians have rallied together for a worthy cause, decluttering their homes and donating 60,000 old phones to recycle, which will allow OzHarvest to deliver the equivalent amount of meals to people in need.

Deliveroo and Uber Eats aren’t the only way to deliver a meal, as MobileMuster and OzHarvest’s successful summer initiative Mobile For A Meal will help deliver 60,000 meals to vulnerable Australians.

“Recycling efforts have not only helped OzHarvest but also helped the mobile phone industry to play their role in product stewardship and ensure that products that reach their end of life are recycled in a safe, secure and ethical way,” says Stuart MacIntyre, Chair of the Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA) which manages the MobileMuster program.

“I am overjoyed that so many people have put their old mobile phones to good use,” says Ronni Kahn, CEO of OzHarvest, “through this great partnership, old technology has been saved from landfill and turned into a healthy hot meal for someone who really needs it”.

Although e-waste and food waste aren’t typically related, the initiative tackles these two growing waste issues in Australia; with 10 billion dollars of food wasted every year, while there are over 25 million old mobiles sitting around in Australian homes waiting to be recycled.

“Mobile For A Meal has been a huge success for the MobileMuster program,” says Spyro Kalos, Recycling Manager at MobileMuster, “we have seen a 17% increase in the number of phones we usually collect over those summer months which means more Australians are recycling.”

“The initiative has been successful threefold; encouraging people to recycle, keeping old mobile phones out of landfill and contributing to the important work that OzHarvest are doing,” he concluded.

For more information about mobile phone recycling visit the MobileMuster website

For more information about food rescue initiatives visit the OzHarvest website

Image credit: Stuart MacIntyre, Director of Optus Business Technology and Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA) Chairman presenting MobileMuster cheque to Henrietta Ardlie, Head of Fundraising OzHarvest.

 

 

 

Quote5.jpg

How will 5G improve network performance

While the technical standards for 5G are still being developed, experts agree that 5G will offer: Latency of less than 1ms; Ability to deliver speeds of up to 10 Gbps and beyond; Energy efficiency in running 1000s of devices; and Improved network capacity by enabling millions of low bandwidth devices to connect simultaneously. Where 4G focussed on providing improved speed and capacity for individual mobile phone users, 5G will enable more industrial applications, and could be a major technological driver in industrial digitalisation. For more information about 5G read our latest report from Deloitte Access Economics. Download the complete report.

Spectrum drawing.png

Flexibility in Network Deployment Regulations

The Department of Communications and the Arts has just completed its public consultation on a suite of amendments to the regulatory framework governing carriers’ deployment of mobile network infrastructure. AMTA joined Communications Alliance in welcoming the opportunity to provide comment on the DoCA consultation paper.

man on mobile in field.jpg

ARPANSA's latest literature review reports on new Australian study which finds no increase in brain cancer with mobile phone use

In The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA's) regular EMR literature survey for May 2016, ARPANSA report on the recent Australian study by Professor Simon Chapman which asks the question "Has the incidence of brain cancer risen in Australia since the introduction of mobile phones 29 years ago?".  The paper pubslished in cancer epidermology compared mobile phone ownership with the incidence of brain cancer in Australia.  In the study, brain cancer incidence rates from 1982 to 2012 are compared with the number of mobile phone accounts in the Australian population from 1987 to 2012. The study found that although mobile phone use increased from 0% to 94% during the 30 year period brain cancer incidence rates were stable.  This finding is consitent with previous studies in the US, UK. New Zealand and Nordic countries. See ARPANSA's commentary here: Full paper may be found here: