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Optus Completes 2G Network Turn Off

Optus closed down remaining 2G network on 1 August

Optus finalised the shut down of its 2G network across Australia on 1 August, with 2G services across QLD, NSW, ACT, VIC, SA and TAS turned off from 1 August 2017.

This is the second and final phase of the shut down following 2G services being turned off across NT and WA in April.

Customers of Virgin Mobile and Optus Wholesale service providers using the 2G GSM network will also be affected.

As 2G capabilities become eclipsed by 3G and 4G network technologies, the closure will allow Optus to review options to re-allocate some of this spectrum to improve customer experience and mobile services and also investigate emerging technologies such as 5G.

Dennis Wong, Managing Director of Networks at Optus said, “Our priority throughout this process has been to ensure our 2G customers are prepared for this change and have the right level of support to allow for a smooth transition toour 3G and 4G services.”

“There is no doubt that the 2G network, which was first established in 1993, played an important role in our network, particularly when we were first establishing ourselves across Australia.

“Nearly 25 years on, and our customer levels using the 2G mobile network have significantly decreased as greater smartphone usage and advances in 4G technologies drive customer preferences for mobile data and faster speeds.This was the right time for us to close the 2G network,” said Mr Wong.

For people looking for more information or that may have questions around what to do, Optus recommends they visit this blog post on the Optus Yes Crowd blog

It's also the perfect time to recycle your old 2G handsets through AMTA's MobileMuster program. Find your nearest drop-off location here.

17 Aug 2017

 

 

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