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Google: The Newest Member to Join MobileMuster

The Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association (AMTA) welcomes Google to the industry’s official recycling program MobileMuster.

MobileMuster, run in partnership with mobile handset manufacturers and network operators Telstra, Optus, Vodafone and Virgin Mobile, provides a free national recycling program for mobiles and accessories.

“The industry is delighted to welcome Google, who launched their Pixel phone by Google last year, to our world class recycling program,” said Chief Executive Officer of AMTA, Chris Althaus.

“The MobileMuster program is formally accredited by the Federal Government as a voluntary product stewardship scheme so it is great to see new members joining the program as they introduce their products to the Australian market,” concluded Althaus.

“MobileMuster is an example of industry working together to deliver a robust and sustainable take back program.  This is one part of our members commitment to product stewardship,” said Recycling Manager, Spyro Kalos.

“MobileMuster ensure mobiles are kept out of landfill and recycled in a responsible, secure and environmentally sound way, placing reusable commodities back into the supply chain,” concluded Kalos.

Since the program started in late 1998 it has diverted more than 1,320 tonnes of mobiles and accessories from landfill for recycling, including more than an estimated 11.9 million handsets and batteries.With over 96 per cent of the materials used in a mobile being recyclable, they can be reused to make new products, avoiding future greenhouse gas emissions, saving energy, protecting our environment and conserving scarce natural resources.

MobileMuster accepts and recycles all brands and types of mobile phones, batteries, chargers and accessories. They provide over 3,500 drop-off points across Australia to make it easy for people to recycle. Everything is recycled, nothing is resold and all data is destroyed.

27 September 2017

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Interference to mobile networks - Buyer Beware!

Interference to the mobile network can cause calls to drop out, data speeds to drop and impact on network performance. In the worst case, it can prevent someone else from making a call to Triple Zero in an emergency. The ACMA has now made available a consumer factsheet on interference that explains some of the common causes of interference and what you should do if you are contacted by a mobile network operator about interference to their network.

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Flexibility in Network Deployment Regulations

The Department of Communications and the Arts has just completed its public consultation on a suite of amendments to the regulatory framework governing carriers’ deployment of mobile network infrastructure. AMTA joined Communications Alliance in welcoming the opportunity to provide comment on the DoCA consultation paper.

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In-depth Analysis of the Mobile Industry

Mobile World Live has published its first annual report, offering an in-depth analysis of the true state of the mobile industry. Split into five chapters – a full market overview, 5G, Security, IoT and Telecoms IT – the report highlights a number of key findings.

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Connected Cars: from Here to Autonomy

GSMA's global survey, conducted in November and December 2016 with nearly 1,000 respondents, uncovered significant understanding of the issues facing the wider deployment and monetisation of connected cars, along with significant enthusiasm for connected car technologies and services in general and autonomous driving.

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ARPANSA's latest literature review reports on new Australian study which finds no increase in brain cancer with mobile phone use

In The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA's) regular EMR literature survey for May 2016, ARPANSA report on the recent Australian study by Professor Simon Chapman which asks the question "Has the incidence of brain cancer risen in Australia since the introduction of mobile phones 29 years ago?".  The paper pubslished in cancer epidermology compared mobile phone ownership with the incidence of brain cancer in Australia.  In the study, brain cancer incidence rates from 1982 to 2012 are compared with the number of mobile phone accounts in the Australian population from 1987 to 2012. The study found that although mobile phone use increased from 0% to 94% during the 30 year period brain cancer incidence rates were stable.  This finding is consitent with previous studies in the US, UK. New Zealand and Nordic countries. See ARPANSA's commentary here: Full paper may be found here: