Monday, 18 December 2017
MOBILE TELECOMMUNICATIONS HEALTH AND SAFETY NEWS

EME Update November 2013


Welcome to the November 2013 edition of EME Update, the Australian Mobile Telecommunications Association’s newsletter on global scientific research, news and views on health and safety aspects of mobile telecommunications.

 

 

Chris Althaus, Chief Executive Officer, AMTA.


Chris Althaus CEO - email                   

Federal government pledge $5 million over five years for mobile signals research

The second 2.5 million dollar research grant for studies into the possible health effects of exposure to electromagnetic radiation from mobile phone technology has been awarded in the space of a year by the Australian government.
NHMRC

Government EME research funding not influenced by mobiles industry

The Australian mobile phone industry has welcomed the announcement of $5 million of Federal Government funding for independent research into the possible health effects of mobile phone signals over the next five years.
SAR testing

New sleep lab to check if mobile phone signals effect kids brains

A new research laboratory will be set up at Wollongong University to investigate if mobile phone signals have any effect on children’s brain activity while they sleep.
Croft on phone

Harmonise mobile phone radiation safety standards, industry tells US review

Exposure limits for mobile phone and base station signals should be changed in the US to bring the country in line with the international safety standards adopted by most other countries - including Australia – the mobile phone industry has told the US communications regulator.
FCC2

Skin cancers of the head and neck not linked to mobile phone use

Mobile phone users are not more likely to have skin cancer around the head and neck compared to non-users, a study of more than 3 million people in Denmark has found.
phone user flickr timparkinson

Israeli study links mobile phone users saliva with cancer risk

A study that compared the saliva content of 20 mobile phone users with 20 deaf people has resulted in media headlines that claim just 17 minutes of phone calls a day dramatically increases your risk of cancer.
Fertility Research

Expert replaced on Canadian safety standard review panel after conflict of interest claims

The panel of experts elected to review Canada’s safety standards for wireless signals have been forced to find a new lead researcher after the group’s Chair voluntarily stepped down due to conflict of interest allegations.
RSC

US air regulator says mobiles safe for use through all phases of flight

An Australian pilots union has called for changes to the country’s aviation regulations after the US air regulator decided to lift a ban on the use of mobile phones and other electronic devices during flight.
phone use on plane

Deadly shocks and nasty burns from counterfeit mobile devices prompts warning from mobile makers

Mobile phone manufacturers have appealed to consumers to use only genuine certified mobile devices, batteries and chargers after reports emerged of the death of a Chinese woman allegedly electrocuted while using a fake iPhone charger.
Fake iPhone

Changes to the Australian road rules for mobile GPS use backed by AMTA

The Australian mobile phone industry has thrown its support behind changes to the Australian Road Rules to clarify the use of mobile devices as navigational aids.
cradle maps

Pedestrians overtake drivers in US for mobile related hospitalisation

More than 1,500 pedestrians were treated in hospital emergency rooms in 2010 for injuries related to using mobile phones while walking, according to estimates in a US study.
Man_speaking_on_mobile_phone2

Smartphones to blame for increase in shortsighted kids, says British eye expert

Texting, tweeting and browsing the net with your smartphone too close to your face could be the reason the rates of short sightedness among young people has soared in recent years, a leading laser eye surgeon in the UK has claimed.
smartphone eyesight

WHO investigate “primitive” e-waste recycling by children

Australians selling their old mobile phones to buy-back schemes that ship them to developing countries should consider the potentially dangerous effects on children’s health from unregulated recycling.
ewaste children

In Brief

  • 4G and smart meters the focus of annual Science and Wireless conference
  • Users of illegal mobile repeaters that disrupt coverage risk jail, warns ACMA
  • Canadian health authority releases toolkit to educate doctors on wireless signals
 

Subscribe to EME Update

To receive new editions of EME Update by email please subscribe here.
 

 

 

www.amta.org.au

© Copyright

We welcome any feedback on this newsletter or our proposed activities; please email us: Feedback
Problems viewing this email? Click here. To unsubscribe from this list click here.